A little progress

A little progress or none at all? I was taken by this little motivator from my gym earlier in the week: A little progress each day adds up to big results.

The second week here in Salt Lake City is drawing to a close and it feels that I have worked into the night and made no progress at all. One week to go and I have London (including my favourite Irish ancestor who lived mostly in London) as well as Somerset/Wiltshire to look at. And the DNA matches and questions continue coming.

Six years ago I spent most of my time here in the Family History Library scanning baptisms, marriages and burials from books, fiche or films to a USB drive. This time I am finding that most of the information will be available at the GSV when I get home. Except for an intriguing book about the Black Loyalists. After half a day of searching we found that it is at scanning so an electronic version will be available at home in the fullness of time.

I thought I now had a process for looking for all of my non conformists and Methodists. But it failed on its test run. Probably not because of the process but because I have failed to find the right combination of Christopher Abbey born 1815 in Yorkshire or thereabouts to search. Suggestions for optional search parameters will be gratefully received.

I have gone back to fixing up my Family Search family tree which got in a mess when trying to use the Legacy Family Tree extension. It still has a way to go before it is up to scratch for the FamilySearch Tree App.

Army records are a class of records that I have am slowly getting a handle on although I have avoided them for years. After all Uncle Charlie’s biography has been written by Charles Page and we a good deal of Uncle John’s diaries – except for the one that covers his journey from Crete to prison camp in Lubeck, Germany. So I was pleased to discover in TNA’s catalogue that this journey was investigated after the war. Another thing to read at the TNA. Of course I have read a little about my great uncles in World War I – Uncle George who didn’t come home and Uncle Lou who did and who left a repatriation file of a couple of inches. Then there is Lieutenant Colonel Sir Edward Michael Ryan.  The Michael came from his Ryan grandfather and the Edward I assume comes from Edmund Burke the Anglo Irish statesmen born in 1729 and family connection. Wikipedia has a nice entry on the action that led to Edward Michael Ryan receiving a foreign decoration.

That leaves George Watts of Nottingham who joined the 19th Regiment of Foot in 1812. I have spent a lot of time looking at his records this week. For a little progress I hope. Again, it will be my visit to the TNA where I am relying on finding the muster rolls and pay lists to turn a little progress into big results.

Genealogy Do Over and Legacy

Ancestors of Donald George Baulch

Thank you to those of you who asked how I envisage using Legacy’s To-Do Items as part of my Genealogy Do Over research log.

Here is my view of my April Article for VicGUM’s newsletter. The article was written in response to questions I have been asked about how I use Legacy’s To-Do List as my research log. For this month only my mailing list version of the article is given here with screenshots. Next month I shall revert to m

Legacy mailing list. As usual, a version with screen shots will be published in VicGUM’s newsletter.

In looking back on my Genealogy Do Over experience so far I have included some consideration of how I envisage using Legacy’s To-Do List for recording my research plan or goals as well as use Legacy’s To-Do List after the manner of Geoff Rasmussen in his book Legacy Family Tree Unlocked!

For some I hope it answers your questions. For others I hope that it encourages you to look at Thomas MacEntee’s Genealogy Do Over.

y usual practice of publishing a text only version on the Aus-

Genealogy Do Over – Week 2

In my interviews for Genealogy Do Over Week 2 I returned to when I started collecting my family stories.  I went back to my first official family history visit which, coincidentally, involved going back to my first home, Squattleseamere. For my second interview I went back to the time of big shearing teams at Dunmore. I looked again at the transcript of an interview about shearing at the Dunmore shed when the shed was run by my Grandpa Baulch.

In setting my research goals I have tried to select some goals which should be achievable in the time of the Do Over while, at the same time, giving me time to test my new research process as set out in my Genealogy Golden Rules.

CONDUCTING SELF INTERVIEW

For my self interview I reflected upon my first family interview. This interview marks the time when I changed from just listening and absorbing family stories to consciously setting out to answer the question I am always asked but could rarely answer before this visit – You’re a Baulch are you?

CONDUCTING FAMILY INTERVIEW

As a child I absorbed the atmosphere in the Dunmore shed at shearing time and listened, engrossed, to the many stories Grandpa Baulch told me about the men who shore there. This interview is not with my grandfather but with one of the shearers, Bill Meade. It was to be about Grandpa in the Dunmore shed. Or that is what I thought on my way to Port Fairy for an afternoon’s chat.

FAMILY GROUP SHEETS

I rarely use Family Group Sheets. Rather I use Legacy’s Family Group Report in the List Style format. Why I do so means I need to add another rule to my Genealogy Golden Rules:

Keep it simple. I have ONE place, my Legacy database, which contains ALL the information I have gathered about my family.

SETTING RESEARCH GOALS

In setting my research goals I have looked at what reports and/or output I hope to produce by the completion of the Genealogy Do Over, how I plan to go about this and the limitations that might prevent me achieving my research goals. Consequently, I have tried to keep my goals simple and achievable within the duration of the Do Over.

My focus on output will be confined to:

  • Reviewing a Family Group Report for my three greats grandfather Private George Watts (1792-1845).
  • Reviewing my Family Group Report for my four greats grandfather John Bourke Ryan Esquire (1760 – 1835).
  • Creating a timeline for Squattleseamere Pastoral Run.
  • Substantiating my connection to John Bourke Ryan and George Watts. After all, this is a genealogical Do Over.
  • Creating some charts as I go.
  • Maintaining a weekly blog for at least the duration of the Genealogy Do Over.

My research process, or how I am I going to achieve my research goals, is as follows:

  • I shall start each piece of research by creating a To-Do Item.
  • The completed To-Do Item will then become part of my Research Log.
  • To comply with my Golden Rule of Sources First Sources will be attached to my To-Do Item in the first instance.
  • I shall set aside some time each day in order to achieve my research goals.

Of course, because family history is my hobby there are many things that may prevent me from achieving my research goals. These are my boundary fences:

  • My research should be confined to producing the output given above. In particular my research goals will set aside for the duration of the Do Over for those Individuals who sparkle and say come hither. This applies in particular to two of my great grandfathers, Samuel Baulch and J R Learmonth.
  • I have a time limit. I plan to have completed my research by Congress 2015 (to be held in Canberra 26-30 March). This ties in quite nicely with the duration of the Do Over.
  • I shall remain involved and committed to my genealogical and computer groups.
  • I shall take time out. Often.