Legacy Users’ Group – City

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The first meeting for 2015 of the Legacy Family Tree Users’ Group – City will be held on next Wednesday, 18 February.
10 am – 10.45 am  the topic will be Starting out with Legacy 8 and adding Individuals (time permitting).
11.00 am to 11.45 am the topic will be Tagging.
PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING CHANGE OF VENUE:
Meeting Room 4.1 Fourth Floor – Hayden Raysmith Room
Ross House, 247 Flinders Lane
Cost $4.00

Tentative Schedule for the rest of the year is as follows:
Mar 18 Starting Out: Backup and Restore; General: Searching for World War I veterans in our family tree
(1.3 First Floor Meeting Room 3)
Apr 15 Starting Out: Names and Dates; General: Potential Problems (and Statistics?)
May 20 Starting Out: Locations; General: Using the To-Do List as a research log
Jun 17 Starting Out: Family Group Report; General: Media Relinker
Jul 15 Starting Out: Sources – Newspapers; General: “Syncing” laptops and tablets
Aug 19 Starting Out: Options Customise (and customising My Toolbar?); General: Searching for Individuals in an English Census
Sep 16 Starting Out: Notes and Events; General: Picture Gallery
Oct 21 Starting Out: Fixing Mistakes (particularly links in your tree); General: Split Screen – drag and dropping an Individual
Nov 18 Starting Out: Family Charts; General: Show and Tell
(1.3 First Floor Meeting Room 3)

For further information please contact Patsy Daly at patsy@patsyspaddocks.com.

Genealogy Do Over – Reflection

 

Reflection
Reflection

Great success requires long term patience
Gideon Haigh about successful Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglu,
ABC Offsiders 1 Feb 2015.

BACKGROUND
I had such plans for my retirement. Or so I thought. Finally, I would be able to tell some of the family stories I have gathered over the years.
No so. It just hasn’t happened. My family database is a mess. And I continue to be beguiled by every bright shiny object that passes before me.
So what can I do? How can I optimize my ability to gather and tell my family stories? I started last year by jettisoning my pen and notebook in favour of a tablet, camera and USB drive. But that wasn’t enough. I hadn’t considered applying to my quest for family stories the research model I had honed in my studies and practiced in my employment.
I hadn’t considered a comprehensive review of my research model until I read of Thomas MacEntee’s Genealogy Do Over.
Now, in Week 6 it’s not the results of my research that I have set aside but the methodology I have used for my genealogical research. If I ever had one that is. After a lifetime of gathering family stories, it is only now, as part of the Genealogy Do Over, that I am having a serious look at tweaking my trusty research methodology and incorporating the Genealogy Do Over principles to build a genealogy research methodology for myself. A genealogy research methodology that, hopefully, optimizes the chances of achieving my goal of writing my family stories.
I am looking for better ways of storing my family stories in the one place –with their associated sources included and the relevant media files linked. And let’s hope that the bad habits have already been banished forever.
MY GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH MODEL
INTRODUCTION
We all want to belong one way or another. I belong to the Geelong Football Club. I also belong to my Baulch family. And just as I listened to stories my father and grandparents told me I want to share my family stories with those who shared their stories with me as well as with those to come.
But how can I share my family stories if I haven’t been able to over the past few years? This is where the Genealogy do Over is helping – particularly in showing me how to create my Genealogical Research Model with the aim of optimizing my chances of gathering family stories and helping me find time to focus on telling those stories.
On reflection my Genealogy Do Over began well with the consideration of my Genealogy Golden Rules.
From my Genealogy Golden Rules everything seems to have fallen into place. So far. Articulating and, more importantly, writing down my Research Goals for the period of the Do Over is helping me keep those Bright Shiny Objects parked and in abeyance for possible consideration later on.
I have also given some more thought about managing my projects or Research Goals. About recording my Research Goals in my genealogy software. For, as my sister agreed, keeping everything in the one place is preferable to having numerous documents, spreadsheets and the like elsewhere. I just lose track of anything not linked to my family database.
I have been revisiting my use of Legacy’s To-Do List as a research log. Now, as part of the Genealogy Do Over, I think there is more I can do with it – Including exporting it as a CSV file should I ever wish to look at it in spreadsheet form!
I have had considerable trouble distinguishing between conducting the research and tracking searches only to realise that, for me, they are one and the same. However, the improvement I can make is to ensure that information for both is captured completely in the relevant To-Do Item in my family database.
A little tweaking of the naming of my master Sources, the naming of my top level media folder and the naming of my research log categories has resulted in an unexpected concordance between the three based on subject.
I prefer to evaluate evidence with my Legacy Events (Disproved or Not Proven for example) and, finally, I have consigned investigating further education options to Bright Shiny Objects for the time being.
MY REVISED GENEALOGY GOLDEN RULES
Right at the top of my genealogy model are my Genealogy Golden Rules. These define the landscape, the environment or the paddock in which my genealogy model operates.

  1. I shall continue to enjoy searching for family stories. Gathering and sharing stories has been a passion for most of my life. May my search for family stories continue to be a joy.
  2. I shall continue to share my research and stories with others. Many, many more people than I shall ever remember have shared their stories with us. So it’s a delight to share our family stories in return. Moreover, sharing is often a source of many more stories as well.
  3. “Well begun is half done” attributed to Aristotle.
  4. “The secret of success is consistency of purpose” Benjamin Disraeli
  5. Focus on output. The very reason I search for family stories is to share them with others. The corollary to this rules is that Gathering and telling my family stories is an iterative process. When I start a search I don’t know until the end whether I have the information I require to tell a story. I may have to do further research. I may need to reconsider how that information is stored in my family database. Certainly it is my goal to do it right the first time. But that rarely happens. Generally I have to return to the beginning and review what I have gathered. Research is an iterative process.
  6. Sources first. Immediately on finding some family information I shall capture that information into my family database by linking the Source to the relevant Research Log item and by, so I can find the information easily, including the media file name in the relevant Research Log.
  7. My Legacy database contains information I have gathered about my family over the years. In 2015 viewing my family database as a properly and appropriately structured database is cool. There is nothing preventing me using a Word document or an Excel spreadsheet but these documents must be linked to my family database in some way.
  8. Apply the KISS principle. In this instance I am defining this principle as Keep It Small and Simple.
  9. That I haven’t found something doesn’t mean it isn’t to be found at all.

CONCLUSION
I shall omit consideration of my model, together with screenshots as appropriate, for next time but has the Genealogy Do Over been worthwhile?
Yes.
Yes, if for nothing else just in starting over my search for my three greats grandfather George Watts I found his death certificate as well as that of his wife Mary Watts.
Yes, in that I have revised my initially overly ambitious Research Goal into small manageable bits that are achievable and, therefore, should conclude with a sense of achievement.
Yes, for all the improvements to my research process going forward.
Yes, most of all, for alerting me to Bright Shiny Objects. I shall be most mindful of them as I search for the story of my first home in the archives of the Public Record Office of Victoria. PROV is just awash with Bright Shiny Objects.

 

Genealogy Do Over – To-Do Items

doing-research

Yesterday I wrote about using Legacy’s To-Do Lists as a research log for my genealogy research. Thank you for your requests that I give you some screen shots of how I created my To-do Items that shall now make up my research log. So here goes.

In all, I have so far created 12 To-Do Items.

GenealogyDoOver-0

At the top level I have one Item for my Genealogy Do Over Research Goals. This To-Do Item for my Research Goals shows that my Research Goals consist of four elements – George Watts, John Bourke Ryan, Scrapbook of Chart examples and Squattleseamere Pastoral Run.

GenealogyDoOver-7

I haven’t really started as yet on three items. The fourth is for my three greats grandfather George Watts. The To-Do Item for George Watts sits between my overall Research Goals and Individual To-Do Items for a particular piece of research. This To-Do Item explains, in general terms, what I hope to achieve with respect to George Watts over the course of the Genealogy Do Over. The first part is to confirm my connection to George Watts through, for the moment at least, using evidence found on birth, marriage and death certificates.

GenealogyDoOver-6

From George’s To-Do Item I have raised several To-Do Items for specific pieces of research. These Items aren’t necessarily connected to George Watts’s record. For example, to establish my connection to my three greats grandfather, George Watts  I used my Grandpa Baulch’s birth, marriage and death certificates to substantiate his relationship to his mother, Eliza Ann Porter.

GenealogyDoOver-2

Now I expect to have many, many of these specific types of To-Do Items. A bit like rows in a spreadsheet based research log I suppose. So I created a template just to remind myself what matters should be considered here and what issues belong elsewhere in my genealogy database. This is what my template looks like:

GenealogyDoOver-1

One of my goals for Genealogy Do Over is to get into the practice of doing Sources First. So I then added the Sources I would look at for this To-Do Item.

GenealogyDoOver-3 Finally, I have recorded my results under the Results tab. In this instance I simply referred to the Media files of the Sources used.

GenealogyDoOver-4While I was creating my to-Do Items I noticed that the Categories roughly matched the folders the main folders under my Media folder so I have done a little tweaking to get these to match.

I do hope that this helps a little to explain what I have decided to do.

Genealogy Do Over – Week 3

Land Registers at the Public Record Office of Victoria
Land Registers at the Public Record Office of Victoria

TRACKING RESEARCH

Why is it necessary to track my research?

Mainly because I have unwittingly doubled up on my research. More often than I care to admit. Often more than twice for the same information. Also, I have ignored obvious sources of further research. I have frequently been distracted by those Bright Shiny Objects (such as my favourite Land Registers pictured above). So let me just admit it. My research process has just grown haphazardly over the years. And it shows. If I had only taken more care updating my processes for keeping track of my research I would have saved so much time.

Genealogy Research Log

In 2014 I set aside my pen and notebook for a tablet and Legacy’s To-Do List.

So I have been rather dismayed to read of the enthusiasm for using a spreadsheet based research log. Just something else for me to lose track of I thought. My sister agreed. Keep everything in the one place she said.

What in ever was I worried about? In listening to Thomas MacEntee’s Genealogy Do Over webinar for Legacy Family Tree I found my post decision justification.

With very little tweaking I have now created a general Legacy To-Do Item template containing all the elements I wish to include in a research log. Particularly new is the note to remind me to add any relevant file names or links. Thank you Thomas MacEntee for that tip.

Now it’s just a simple matter to copy the template to a new To-Do Item. This is analogous to a creating another line in a spreadsheet based Research Log.

Furthermore, I have done a couple of other things to clean up my research process. First, I have aligned the To-Do Item Categories to the names (or Categories) of my top level Media folders. Well, mostly. If necessary, this adjustment should make it even easier to find my Media files. Next, I have the one place – in Legacy’s To-Do List – for the three levels of my planned research:

  1. The top level To-Do Item will outline my research plan for a three month period. My current research plan, for example, is my plan for the Genealogy Do Over. One element of this plan is to establish my connection to my three greats grandfather, George Watts.
  2. The second level To-Do Item is more specific. For example, the goal here is still to establish my connection to George Watts. But at this level I have listed the birth, marriage and death information I am relying on to establish this connection. These include birth and marriage information for myself and birth, marriage and death information for:
    1. Donald George Baulch,
    2. Parke Egbert Baulch,
    3. Eliza Ann Porter and
    4. Lydia Watts.
  3. The bottom, or more detailed, level of my To-Do Items is creating a To-Do Item that is equivalent to a line in aspreadsheet based Research Log. At this level I have a To-Do Item for each step in establishing my connection to George Watts. These are:
      1. in my record, a To-Do item for establishing my connection to Donald George Baulch,
      2. in the record for Donald George Baulch, a To-Do item for establishing his connection to Parke Egbert Baulch,
      3. in the record for Parke Egbert Baulch a To-Do item for establishing his connection to Eliza Ann Porter,
      4. in the record for Eliza Ann Porter a To-Do item for establishing her connection to Lydia Watts and
      5. in the record for Lydia Watts a To-Do item for establishing her connection to George Watts.

    I like that, at this level, my Individual To-Do Item (or line in my Research Log) is attached to the relevant Individual in my family database for easy access and not in a spreadsheet somewhere else.

Conducting Research

So, with all these To-Do Items created I was ready to conduct my research. New in 2015, and as part of this Genealogy Do Over, is my resolve to apply one of my Genealogy Golden Rules to assign SOURCES to the relevant To-Do Item FIRST. I then assigned Sources and linked Media to the relevant Individual Events. This is done as part of the initial research process and before any further consideration. No more leaving Sources and Media until last. In the past leaving Sources and Media to last has meant that information I am relying upon has been lost somewhere on a computer drive or somewhere in a box of papers! Such a practice is now history.

Genealogy Do Over – Week 2

In my interviews for Genealogy Do Over Week 2 I returned to when I started collecting my family stories.  I went back to my first official family history visit which, coincidentally, involved going back to my first home, Squattleseamere. For my second interview I went back to the time of big shearing teams at Dunmore. I looked again at the transcript of an interview about shearing at the Dunmore shed when the shed was run by my Grandpa Baulch.

In setting my research goals I have tried to select some goals which should be achievable in the time of the Do Over while, at the same time, giving me time to test my new research process as set out in my Genealogy Golden Rules.

CONDUCTING SELF INTERVIEW

For my self interview I reflected upon my first family interview. This interview marks the time when I changed from just listening and absorbing family stories to consciously setting out to answer the question I am always asked but could rarely answer before this visit – You’re a Baulch are you?

CONDUCTING FAMILY INTERVIEW

As a child I absorbed the atmosphere in the Dunmore shed at shearing time and listened, engrossed, to the many stories Grandpa Baulch told me about the men who shore there. This interview is not with my grandfather but with one of the shearers, Bill Meade. It was to be about Grandpa in the Dunmore shed. Or that is what I thought on my way to Port Fairy for an afternoon’s chat.

FAMILY GROUP SHEETS

I rarely use Family Group Sheets. Rather I use Legacy’s Family Group Report in the List Style format. Why I do so means I need to add another rule to my Genealogy Golden Rules:

Keep it simple. I have ONE place, my Legacy database, which contains ALL the information I have gathered about my family.

SETTING RESEARCH GOALS

In setting my research goals I have looked at what reports and/or output I hope to produce by the completion of the Genealogy Do Over, how I plan to go about this and the limitations that might prevent me achieving my research goals. Consequently, I have tried to keep my goals simple and achievable within the duration of the Do Over.

My focus on output will be confined to:

  • Reviewing a Family Group Report for my three greats grandfather Private George Watts (1792-1845).
  • Reviewing my Family Group Report for my four greats grandfather John Bourke Ryan Esquire (1760 – 1835).
  • Creating a timeline for Squattleseamere Pastoral Run.
  • Substantiating my connection to John Bourke Ryan and George Watts. After all, this is a genealogical Do Over.
  • Creating some charts as I go.
  • Maintaining a weekly blog for at least the duration of the Genealogy Do Over.

My research process, or how I am I going to achieve my research goals, is as follows:

  • I shall start each piece of research by creating a To-Do Item.
  • The completed To-Do Item will then become part of my Research Log.
  • To comply with my Golden Rule of Sources First Sources will be attached to my To-Do Item in the first instance.
  • I shall set aside some time each day in order to achieve my research goals.

Of course, because family history is my hobby there are many things that may prevent me from achieving my research goals. These are my boundary fences:

  • My research should be confined to producing the output given above. In particular my research goals will set aside for the duration of the Do Over for those Individuals who sparkle and say come hither. This applies in particular to two of my great grandfathers, Samuel Baulch and J R Learmonth.
  • I have a time limit. I plan to have completed my research by Congress 2015 (to be held in Canberra 26-30 March). This ties in quite nicely with the duration of the Do Over.
  • I shall remain involved and committed to my genealogical and computer groups.
  • I shall take time out. Often.

Self Interview – a Baulch are you?

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In 1969 Victor Hallett gave me his Baulch family tree papers. Fifteen years earlier he had started gathering information needed to build the family tree for Francis and Enoch Baulch. Making sense of all the information he had gathered had become just too difficult for him. No wonder. Victor Hallett’s mother and my Grandpa Baulch were two of more than 180 of Francis Baulch’s grandchildren and while Enoch Baulch had several grandchildren their number was not nearly as many as Francis Baulch’s grandchildren.
Many of Francis and Enoch’s descendants lived, as I did, not far from Kirkstall where both

Francis and Enoch lived in later life. So it is any wonder that I was often asked “You’re a Baulch are you?” Then there generally there is a pause. “Related to the ones at Mount Koroite?” or “The school bus driver’s mother is a Baulch” or something similar.

Indeed, my very first family history visit was taken with my father to Norman Broadwood. Both men had farmed on blocks which were part of the Squattleseamere Closer Settlement Estate. Norman had his father William Broadwood’s block and when I was a small child my father had Jeremiah Gleeson’s block. Jeremiah had previously worked at Dunmore (but I think this refers to the Parish of Dunmore – not my father’s childhood home).

Norman’s grandmother was Mary Ann Baulch. What’s more she had been born at sea. Her parents, Norman said, had emigrated because Mary Ann’s father, Enoch, only received 2/6 a week wages when he could find work in Somerset.

Here were some clues about why and when Enoch decided to emigrate. These clues helped me research the story further.

Since that visit other information I have gathered has substantiated and enriched the stories Norman Broadwood told us at my very first family history visit to another family member.

Family Interview – Shearing at Dunmore

Dunmore Tally Board 1917
Dunmore Tally Board 1917

For a few short years as a child I was able to observe and absorb the romance, the noise of the machines and the hustle and bustle of the shed hands in a big shed. And, if I believed Grandpa Baulch, everyone at some stage shore at Dunmore.

So it was, some 20 years after my grandfather died, I went to Port Fairy to have an afternoon’s chat with Bill Meade. Bill had started picking up wool in the sheds in 1923. As it still did when I was a child, shearing started in the Riverina in July and the teams worked their way south until Christmas. Then the work was processing the potato and onion harvest until it was time to head north again the following July.

My interview with Bill nearly came fell apart right at the beginning. Bill said that he hadn’t worked in the Dunmore shed. That’s confirmed by the records I have for Bill Meade isn’t listed.  Rather, Bill said, he worked in the Alanvale shed for Art Baulch. This can’t have happened until at least the 1925 shearing season as both Art at Alanvale and Stan Baulch at Rose Park and, to a lesser extent, Frank Baulch all used the Dunmore shed before then. This meant around 20,000 sheep a year were shorn at Dunmore.

Nevertheless, it was a most interesting afternoon with many insights into the shearing conditions at the time. Also Bill was able to mention many who had worked in the Dunmore Shed.

He also talked about the gun shearers – of Arthur Turner from Ararat and George Young of Orford as two men who could shear 200 sheep a day without much trouble. And of course Bill Edwards. Someone had said that it was impossible to shear that 200 sheep a day. Bill Edwards is reported to have said “Oh I don’t know whether it would be impossible or not but you can see them shorn tomorrow”.

It is certainly true that Bill Edwards shore more than 200 sheep in the Dunmore shed for I have been able to identify the following as his top tallies in the shed:

  • 211 shearing from Pen 8 on 14 Nov 1919
  • 185 shearing from Pen 7 on 20 Nov 1923
  • 183 shearing from Pen 9 on 16 Nov 1922
  • 182 shearing from Pen 2 on 4 Nov 1924
  • 182 shearing from Pen 2 on 3 Nov 1924

However, I haven’t, as yet, been able to identify who was shearing from Pen 9 in 1917. Perhaps Bill Edwards as he was shearing at Dunmore that year. Perhaps not. These are the top tallies for that pen that year:

  • 200 on 21 Nov 1917
  • 198 on 5 Dec 1917
  • 192 on 20 Nov 1917
  • 187 on 19 Nov 1917
  • 184 on 4 Dec 1917

Bill Meade was a life time member of the Australian Workers Union (AWU). Which reminds me of the shearer’s strike on 25 Nov 1887 when my great grandfather Samuel Baulch was at Glengleeson. But that’s a story for another day.

And of course the sheep were held in the Woolly Paddock before going into the shed and counted out on their way to the Shorn Paddock afterwards.