Trove Tuesday: Simpsons at Squattleseamere

Outside the Squattleseamere dining room door
Outside the Squattleseamere dining room door

My first home was on a Squattleseamere Closer Settlement block. Squattleseamere had initially been taken up by Thomas Browne but the second owners of the licence, George Simpson and his younger brother Crawford, are the subject of this article.
Although the Crawfords’ purchase of the pastoral licence and their sale later on are not officially recorded in the surviving pastoral run archives I have known for many years that the Simpsons were definitely on Squattleseamere. This is because a story has been passed down of how Crawford was gored by the imported bull Exhibition and subsequently died of his injuries.
Charles Macknight, one of the partners on Dunmore, regarded the Simpsons as proprietors of Squattleseamere. Furthermore, whenever Macknight writes of the Simpsons he writes of them as equals, as fellow squatters. Indeed whenever one of the Simpsons visited Dunmore it was generally in the company of other nearby squatters as such Medley (formerly of Snakey Creek), McGregor (of Ardonachie) or Phillips (of Tarrone).
When Dunmore mustered cattle for market in March each year those belonging to neighbouring squatters, including the Simpsons, were drafted out. Later in the year mares were accepted from neighbours and Dunmore mares were sent to horses owned by other squatters, including the Simpsons at Squattleseamere.
George Simpson was born in Old Deer, Aberdeenshire in 1830. In 1853, five young men, including a George Simpson, emigrated from the nearby port of Peterhead to Port Phillip. Two years later, George’s younger brother, Crawford, arrived in Melbourne aboard the Marco Polo. It’s not only the official passenger lists that confirm these voyages but associated newspaper entries at the time.
It seems that the Crawford brothers initially worked on Cato’s run where Crawford’s misfortunes started. In 1858 Crawford fell from his horse but his foot was caught in a stirrup and he was dragged. One of Cato’s shepherds found him unconscious. Crawford was so severely injured he wasn’t expected to live.
So perhaps the brothers were taken in by the claim in the sale notice for Squattleseamere and Snakey Creek stations that the cattle were quiet. Thomas Brown had first advertised the sale of his runs in 1857 but it wasn’t until June 1859 that J H Clough and Co finally reported the sale. Unfortunately, the purchaser wasn’t mentioned.
In October 1859 George Simpson married Jane Lyell, a sister of John Cato’s wife Margaret. On the same day another sister, Alison, married a John Simpson.
Then tragedy struck. On 10 Nov 1859 Macknight recorded that Mr Simpson was nearly killed by the bull. George was also injured. George recovered but Crawford died of his injuries three days later.
The runs were sold in 1862, presumably by George Simpson although no mention of the vendor is reported. He had been on Squattleseamere and Snakey Creek runs for just over three years.

NEWSPAPER SOURCES ACCESSED FROM TROVE NEWSPAPERS INCLUDED:
The Age (Melbourne) 17 Nov 1859 p3
The Argus (Melbourne) 12 Jul 1855 p8
The Argus (Melbourne) 5 OCT 1858 p4 c3 Fearful Accident
The Argus (Melbourne) 30 July 1857 p8
Ballarat Star (Ballarat) 24 Jun 1859
OTHER SOURCES ACCESSED INCLUDED:
R V Billis and A S Kenyon, Pastoral Pioneers of Port Phillip, Second Edition (Melbourne, Victoria: Stockland Press, 1974)
Charles Hamilton Macknight, “Dunmore Journals” (MS, Melbourne, Victoria, 1840 – 1873); State Library of Victoria. (Copy of Macknight sisters transcript 1929 held privately).
FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org)
Find My Past (http://www.findmypast.com.au/)
Public Record Office of Victoria “Index to Unassisted Immigrants from the United Kingdom 1852-1923” (www.prov.vic.gov.au)
Scotlandspeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk)

Genealogy Do Over – To-Do Items

doing-research

Yesterday I wrote about using Legacy’s To-Do Lists as a research log for my genealogy research. Thank you for your requests that I give you some screen shots of how I created my To-do Items that shall now make up my research log. So here goes.

In all, I have so far created 12 To-Do Items.

GenealogyDoOver-0

At the top level I have one Item for my Genealogy Do Over Research Goals. This To-Do Item for my Research Goals shows that my Research Goals consist of four elements – George Watts, John Bourke Ryan, Scrapbook of Chart examples and Squattleseamere Pastoral Run.

GenealogyDoOver-7

I haven’t really started as yet on three items. The fourth is for my three greats grandfather George Watts. The To-Do Item for George Watts sits between my overall Research Goals and Individual To-Do Items for a particular piece of research. This To-Do Item explains, in general terms, what I hope to achieve with respect to George Watts over the course of the Genealogy Do Over. The first part is to confirm my connection to George Watts through, for the moment at least, using evidence found on birth, marriage and death certificates.

GenealogyDoOver-6

From George’s To-Do Item I have raised several To-Do Items for specific pieces of research. These Items aren’t necessarily connected to George Watts’s record. For example, to establish my connection to my three greats grandfather, George Watts  I used my Grandpa Baulch’s birth, marriage and death certificates to substantiate his relationship to his mother, Eliza Ann Porter.

GenealogyDoOver-2

Now I expect to have many, many of these specific types of To-Do Items. A bit like rows in a spreadsheet based research log I suppose. So I created a template just to remind myself what matters should be considered here and what issues belong elsewhere in my genealogy database. This is what my template looks like:

GenealogyDoOver-1

One of my goals for Genealogy Do Over is to get into the practice of doing Sources First. So I then added the Sources I would look at for this To-Do Item.

GenealogyDoOver-3 Finally, I have recorded my results under the Results tab. In this instance I simply referred to the Media files of the Sources used.

GenealogyDoOver-4While I was creating my to-Do Items I noticed that the Categories roughly matched the folders the main folders under my Media folder so I have done a little tweaking to get these to match.

I do hope that this helps a little to explain what I have decided to do.

Self Interview – a Baulch are you?

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In 1969 Victor Hallett gave me his Baulch family tree papers. Fifteen years earlier he had started gathering information needed to build the family tree for Francis and Enoch Baulch. Making sense of all the information he had gathered had become just too difficult for him. No wonder. Victor Hallett’s mother and my Grandpa Baulch were two of more than 180 of Francis Baulch’s grandchildren and while Enoch Baulch had several grandchildren their number was not nearly as many as Francis Baulch’s grandchildren.
Many of Francis and Enoch’s descendants lived, as I did, not far from Kirkstall where both

Francis and Enoch lived in later life. So it is any wonder that I was often asked “You’re a Baulch are you?” Then there generally there is a pause. “Related to the ones at Mount Koroite?” or “The school bus driver’s mother is a Baulch” or something similar.

Indeed, my very first family history visit was taken with my father to Norman Broadwood. Both men had farmed on blocks which were part of the Squattleseamere Closer Settlement Estate. Norman had his father William Broadwood’s block and when I was a small child my father had Jeremiah Gleeson’s block. Jeremiah had previously worked at Dunmore (but I think this refers to the Parish of Dunmore – not my father’s childhood home).

Norman’s grandmother was Mary Ann Baulch. What’s more she had been born at sea. Her parents, Norman said, had emigrated because Mary Ann’s father, Enoch, only received 2/6 a week wages when he could find work in Somerset.

Here were some clues about why and when Enoch decided to emigrate. These clues helped me research the story further.

Since that visit other information I have gathered has substantiated and enriched the stories Norman Broadwood told us at my very first family history visit to another family member.