• Snakey Creek,  Squattleseamere

    Trove Tuesday: Simpsons at Squattleseamere

    My first home was on a Squattleseamere Closer Settlement block. Squattleseamere had initially been taken up by Thomas Browne but the second owners of the licence, George Simpson and his younger brother Crawford, are the subject of this article. Although the Crawfords’ purchase of the pastoral licence and their sale later on are not officially recorded in the surviving pastoral run archives I have known for many years that the Simpsons were definitely on Squattleseamere. This is because a story has been passed down of how Crawford was gored by the imported bull Exhibition and subsequently died of his injuries. Charles Macknight, one of the partners on Dunmore, regarded the Simpsons as proprietors…

  • Baulch,  DNA

    Baulch Y DNA mutations

    When did mutations occur in the Y DNA in our direct paternal line? Perhaps the Colac branch can help in my new DNA search for when a change or mutation on an STR or short tandem repeat marker on the Y chromosome occurred in our Baulch branch. I remember with great affection one of my very early visits to Baulch family members was to the late Clarrie Baulch of Colac who introduced me visit to his wife as his first cousin on the Warry side but his second cousin on the Mitchem side. Perhaps this visit foreshadowed the challenges that were to come as part of my family history research. It’s…

  • Baulch,  Land Research

    Trove Tuesday: Old Roads

    This is a little family story about old roads. A couple of stories just for Trove Tuesday. I wouldn’t have remembered them if Inside History hadn’t organised the cloud funding of the earliest editions of the Hamilton Spectator. It was just a small entry in the Hamilton Spectator that reminded me of two stories my father told be about roads. A small entry that had been overlooked when I first searched the paper version of the Hamilton Spectator many, many years ago at their office. And which I had overlooked in searching microfilm at the State Library of Victoria. As part of the launch of the introduction of the Hamilton…

  • Dunmore,  Land Research

    Land – Laverton

    My methodology for researching land ownership is not necessarily the only way to do land research. Where and when we start with our research depends on the information we have or don’t have. For our current home that is easy. We have the date. We have a place. There is always an element of truth in family stories but often the truth is sufficiently different to make research difficult. Have I said that with enough feeling? For example, there is a story in our family that my great grandfather Samuel Baulch owned a hotel in Cavendish – some distance from his home in Kirkstall. A visit last year to the…

  • Land Research

    Melbourne’s laneways

    This is not a story of my family home but of my volunteer home – the Genealogical Society of Victoria. This is a story about the GSV’s home in the lower basement, or cellar, of 257 Collins Street in Melbourne. Sometimes I am so engrossed in searching for stories amongst the books and memorials of various archives and family history societies that I neglect to look at the family history around me. So it was a year or so ago I was in one of Melbourne’s small laneways off Flinders Lane. That day Flinders Lane was closed to vehicle traffic. As I had my coffee I watched a very large…

  • Baulch,  Dunmore,  Land Research

    Victoria Land Titles – Introduction

    Almost always I have found family stories in Victorian land titles. So where should one start looking? Certainly not by searching current online databases for family historians. Most of the interesting family stories remain buried in files, memorials and research notes in either the Registrar General of Titles’ General Law Library of land titles at Laverton or at the Public Record Office of Victoria (PROV) in North Melbourne or maps at the State Library of Victoria. In this blog I outline my personal methodology to search Victorian land titles for my family stories. I generally start by purchasing the current land titles for the parcel of land I am researching. But before…

  • Abbey,  World War I

    World War I – Walking Wounded

    If you are researching your World War I veteran ancestors don’t neglect Repatriation files. WWI stories aren’t confined to those servicemen who didn’t return. Nor are they confined to those servicemen who were granted land under the Closer Settlement Scheme. Stories about World War I veterans can also be found in Repatriation files held by the National Archives of Australia. My great Uncle Lou’s repatriation files contain stories I was unaware of as a child. More generally, though, the repatriation files build on the stories found in the Army personal files which can be accessed by doing a Name Search in the National Archives for Australia search collection area. You…

  • Abbey,  Baulch,  DNA,  Learmonth,  Salter

    Autosomal DNA and Probability

    The general wisdom is that matches on autosomal DNA are only accurate for up to four or five generations (or to second cousins). Beyond this limit any matches that may occur probably occur by chance, not by inheritance. This is because there is always the probability that any match of any kind of 5% or less can be attributed to random chance and not to inheritance. My purpose here is to suggest that, by referring to our traditional written family history research and by careful planning our DNA tests, we may be able to identify matches way beyond our great grandparents and our second cousins. I have two parents. It…

  • Baulch,  DNA

    Y-DNA Baulch

    There are so many genealogical collections readily available these days it is tempting to try them all. Without thought or regard as to a collection’s relevance to the particular information sought. Those collections that are at hand are accessed first. Never mind the other 95% of collections which have yet to be digitised or indexed. It is easy to tap a key and search for the information online when I really do know in my head that my searching would be more productive if only I travelled to archives on the other side of the world or just spent time searching painstakingly through films and microfiche nearer to home. But…

  • Thank You
    Family,  Genealogy Do-over,  Watts

    Genealogy Do Over Cycle 1

    It was serendipity. Thomas MacEntee’s Genealogy Do Over arrived in December 2014. Just when I had bedded down using Legacy Family Tree‘s To-Do Lists, my tablet, my camera and a USB drive instead of my trusty pen and notebook. When I was despondent. When all I seemed to have were insurmountable brick walls. Just when I was considering my projects for 2015. Thank you Thomas MacEntee for addressing a gaping hole in my genealogical research practices. More than 6,000 Facebook members suggests I am not alone. So are you considering doing the Genealogy Do Over in Cycle 2? I know that many of you who I spoke to at Congress…